New EcoDiesel owner guide

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flying7

Active Member
Jul 15, 2014
175
41
28
CALI
Truck Year
2014
I was thinking it would be good to provide a guide of best practices for a new ecodiesel owner. I know it would of benefited me especially since its my first diesel.

I will start it off

1) Change oil every 10K miles
2) Change fuel filter ever 20K miles
^^ I know these two are subjective, but it seems like an acceptable number after getting opinions from a lot of people.
3) Front & Rear diff service??
4) Transmission fluid and filter?

..anything else? lets build a nice list and compile into one so it will be easy to track.
 

jdn112011

Well-Known Member
Oct 18, 2015
1,202
310
83
27
Roseau, MN
Truck Year
2015
Do the rear by 30 it's black. Especially if you have limited slip breaking in
 
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BoostN

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Jul 27, 2013
3,745
958
113
Tennessee
ecodieselram.com
Truck Year
Not Listed
Good info from all. I will try and pull that info from the owners manual to make it a little more user friendly for users on the site here.
 

Buggy-Bumpers

Member
Feb 21, 2016
36
15
8
Truck Year
2016
Change the fuel filter twice a year, before Winter and after Winter. Some say that's too much but a little extra maintenance never hurt, besides this will ensure that crappy Winter Diesel doesn't leave your filter clogged.
You know what they say, "You can pay me now, or you can pay me a lot more later"
 

CaptainMal

Active Member
Oct 26, 2015
107
50
28
Sundance, Florida
Truck Year
2014
Grease the front wheel bearings. To do it you pull the discs, remove the ABS sensors. Now fill that cavity with grease while turning the wheel around by hand.

 

jdn112011

Well-Known Member
Oct 18, 2015
1,202
310
83
27
Roseau, MN
Truck Year
2015
Grease the front wheel bearings. To do it you pull the discs, remove the ABS sensors. Now fill that cavity with grease while turning the wheel around by hand.

They're sealed bearings? So why on earth would you pack the ABS/wheel speed count splines full of grease?
 

Brady

Well-Known Member
Jun 7, 2015
991
392
63
OHIO
Truck Year
2015
They're sealed bearings? So why on earth would you pack the ABS/wheel speed count splines full of grease?
To try & extend their service life, why else? Certainly won't hurt anything. And us salt belters know full well how much of a PITA it is changing a hub bearing on a high mileage vehicle.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

jdn112011

Well-Known Member
Oct 18, 2015
1,202
310
83
27
Roseau, MN
Truck Year
2015
To try & extend their service life, why else? Certainly won't hurt anything. And us salt belters know full well how much of a PITA it is changing a hub bearing on a high mileage vehicle.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
Try as you might, I'm in salt country and I've never had an issue with a free moving part not being caked in grease. There's no contact there, so greasing it is pointless.

To each their own I guess but it's not doing anything except trapping dirt that would otherwise come out
 

Brady

Well-Known Member
Jun 7, 2015
991
392
63
OHIO
Truck Year
2015
I'll respectfully disagree. I think the more grease inside the hub, the better.

Maybe find an image showing the bearings sealed and separated from the ABS port?

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

jdn112011

Well-Known Member
Oct 18, 2015
1,202
310
83
27
Roseau, MN
Truck Year
2015
Well considering the wheel speed sensor hole and axle counters are on and against the spindle, and you're trying to grease the wheel bearing which is sealed and pressed into the bolt on hub, (which bolts onto the outside of the spindle) which then accepts the axle shaft where it is bolted to the hub and axle bearing and is 1/3 or less the diameter of the counter section of the axle which is only as large as it is to house the cv bearings inside the boot.

Replace your hub assembly and wheel bearing yourself on any 4wd pickup then come let me know where throwing grease on the outside of your axle is going to grease anything except the outside of a non contact part
 

jdn112011

Well-Known Member
Oct 18, 2015
1,202
310
83
27
Roseau, MN
Truck Year
2015
20160707_132152.png
#1 is your axle shaft which drives the hub
#2 is a dust shield for the inside of the bearing
#3 is the non contact wheel speed counter
 

jdn112011

Well-Known Member
Oct 18, 2015
1,202
310
83
27
Roseau, MN
Truck Year
2015
Screenshot_20160707-133102.jpg 20160707_132850.png Screenshot_20160707-132951.jpg
 

John

Well-Known Member
Nov 13, 2015
1,186
370
83
Here's a better pic of a disassembled hub, you can see the abs sensor sits right over the middle of the two rollers. Seems like grease will make its way to the bearings.
 

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cevans

Active Member
Nov 1, 2015
141
89
28
Boston, MA
www.idparts.com
Truck Year
2014
John - sorry to be blunt, but no.

The image you posted isn't at all like the hub-bearing setup on our trucks. As jdn112011 posted, the bearing assembly is a sealed unit. The bearing is sealed and, if it is healthy, will not let anything inside. Older bearings and joints had "grease fittings" where you could add grease. The bearing you posted above is a tapered bearing that does require greasing when being installed or rebuilt, but, again, it is not at all like the ones we have in the ED.

The ABS sensor is a hall-type sensor that senses the the groves on the axle as they pass by. Adding grease to this assembly could prevent the ABS sensor from reading the ABS ring, leading to random unnecessary ABS activation or ABS system deactivation.
 
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John

Well-Known Member
Nov 13, 2015
1,186
370
83
cevans, thanks for your input. can you upload a photo of the bearing?
 

jdn112011

Well-Known Member
Oct 18, 2015
1,202
310
83
27
Roseau, MN
Truck Year
2015
John - sorry to be blunt, but no.

The image you posted isn't at all like the hub-bearing setup on our trucks. As jdn112011 posted, the bearing assembly is a sealed unit. The bearing is sealed and, if it is healthy, will not let anything inside. Older bearings and joints had "grease fittings" where you could add grease. The bearing you posted above is a tapered bearing that does require greasing when being installed or rebuilt, but, again, it is not at all like the ones we have in the ED.

The ABS sensor is a hall-type sensor that senses the the groves on the axle as they pass by. Adding grease to this assembly could prevent the ABS sensor from reading the ABS ring, leading to random unnecessary ABS activation or ABS system deactivation.
Ok to be honest I haven't pulled off my rotors and looked but I think that our ecodiesel trucks have the new style that he explained. I was unaware that wheel counters and the ABS sensor is now integrated into the hub assemblies. New technology I guess. Not something that I was aware of until pretty extensive research
 

TC Diesel

Well-Known Member
Jul 14, 2016
1,615
447
83
Blaine
www.tcdiesel.com
Truck Year
2015
With the Factory OP (Operating System) the EGR is just to dirty to go 8K miles Mix 50/50 City/Hwy. OA will show that... NOW that T-6 is approved use it ... it contains the additive package that will extend the life of you ED 3.0 in long term ownership.
 

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NC-RAM

Member
Nov 29, 2015
60
20
8
Truck Year
2014
So that is great news ; T-6 is now approved 5-40 w, need to see the new Manuel.